Breaking Canada: Trudeau’s Globalism Risks Stability

PM Justin Trudeau answerPM Justin Trudeau in House of Commons

While the question is loaded enough to illicit heated discussion in both yea and nay camps something strikes my has more critical: Can a broken nation be put back together?

Take a look around Canada; everywhere there is discord. The lines of battle are no longer demarcated in the traditional sense as left or right. The federal government today consumes more space than ever in the lives of Canadians; politicking is the steady-state.

That Canada long ago careened off the road of western liberal democracy to plummet over the cliff toward soft-socialism does not surprise anyone. Rather than seek, perhaps, the most modern route to, say, true liberty Canadian governments have been more concerned with policy decisions inspired by European social agenda.

Politicians of every stripe have been aided by a soft-bellied Canadian population accustomed to government largesse. After the 2008 US financial meltdown Stephen Harper kept Canada on firm financial ground, but throughout his time in power Harper chose not to inflict actual conservative policies on the country. The Liberals under Trudeau continue to feed off many of the former Conservative Government’s policies while pursuing a more ideologically driven agenda that prefers unelected bodies and globalism above a domestic Canada first playbook.

Canadian mainstream-media, doubling down on its role as government PR flaks now shill for the social-justice menu item of the day. Families are under attack by Provincial social-engineers as they rewrite school curriculum under the ruse of inclusiveness and public school boards openly side with one minority group to permit prayer rooms—despite public (taxpayers) outcry against this trend. And these are simply everyday backdrop events. As damaging as they are we see a federal government unwilling to safeguard our borders against the daily flow of illegal aliens that walk into the welcoming arms of the RCMP. The government runs massive budget deficits while sending billions of dollars to foreign countries in his apple-polishing campaign for a seat at the UN.

But as Canadians slide toward summer—keen to be freed from snow blowers, snow tires, and usurious winter heating bills—their first impulse will not be to fret over the declining condition of the their Dominion. (There may be people you count as neighbors who believe government programs make trips to Canadian Tire just that much more enjoyable.) Call it a Canadian thing.

After his election Justin Trudeau rolled out his globalist bona-fides telling the New York Times, “There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada” adding that he sees Canada as “the first post-national state.” That is seriously radical. This was not the only time he has expressed disdain for both citizens and for democracy. On referendums he is quoted as telling Italian PM Renzi, “Referendums are bad things to happen.” Trudeau’s contempt evident as he added, “give people a chance to lash out at institutions—and they might.” Add to the mix his admiration for Communist China, Fidel Castro and the much hyped legalization of marijuana to see his intent is to change society in ways that are unlikely to unify the population, far from it as each action is an attack on those much lauded but rarely articulated Canadian-values.

A nation is a nation only to the degree with which it values sovereignty, language and culture. Trudeau is shifting each of these keystones from its rightful place, risking the relative stability of Canadian society: the denationalization of Canada toward no core identity, aka globalism.

Canada is breaking more each day. The structural damage to the country will become more visible. There will come a time when people will wonder if it can be put right again. Let’s hope it comes soon enough and keep in mind the next federal election will be on us in 2019. Perhaps during summer people will gather in earnest around the picnic table or campfire and talk about the degree of brokenness and exchange ideas as to how they might apply a fix.

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About the Author

Rob McLean

Rob McLean is a regular contributor to Halsey News commenting on Canadian and Global politics. He can be reached at rob@halseynews.com or on Twitter at @DailyRasp.